Average daily distance with loaded touring bike (1 Viewer)

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BlowUpTrains

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2016 i rode from canada to mexico.....i had 4 panniers, on a touring bike. My bike prolly weighed 80lbs loaded. I was averaging about 80 miles a day. My longest ride was probably about 120 miles. I worked at a bicycle store, rode bike as my main transportation daily, it was my life. Most athletes are easily able to ride for 8-12 hours, averaging atleast 10 mph, even in the worst conditions and hills.

With the correct gear, fitness, and most importantly the drive to not be a lil bitch.....its possible to ride over 150 miles a day or even more.

The record for racing across america is about 8 days, unsupported i believe its about 14.....these are elite level endurance riders.

Many cyclist pride themselves in their ablility to cover ground quickly and cheaply. A very popular saying amongst cyclist is "harden the fuck up".....keep hardening my friend....
 
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ironman

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I rode Jacksonville Florida to homestead back then rode lot extra towns just because . Did lot of miles and weeks in CA. I rarely went over 50 miles a day but I'm past 45 years old . I rested and enjoy my time and what I saw.
 

General Van Fleet

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Some people already mentioned Mike Hall but a really inspiring endurance cycling accomplishment that was not is that of Tommy Godwin who rode over 75,000 miles on a 35lb 3speed Raleigh Ace in 1939. While he wasn't riding a fully loaded touring bike I'd imagine he would have been able to achieve an absurdly high average if pressed to.
Tommy Godwin (cyclist, born 1912) - Wikipedia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tommy_Godwin_(cyclist,_born_1912)

My greatest gains have come from cycling well past the point of exhaustion and discomfort many times, 80 miles per day with a loaded bike would probably be at the upper end of what I'd enjoy doing for anything long term.

Pulled a 130 plus mile day from Perry's bike hostel near Jackson LA to Bayou Chicotte state park with 4 panniers plus bob trailer with my 12 lb chihuahua felt great but something of an outlier based on wanting to reach a specific camp site and getting an early start.
 

MFB

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Some people already mentioned Mike Hall but a really inspiring endurance cycling accomplishment that was not is that of Tommy Godwin who rode over 75,000 miles on a 35lb 3speed Raleigh Ace in 1939. While he wasn't riding a fully loaded touring bike I'd imagine he would have been able to achieve an absurdly high average if pressed to.
Tommy Godwin (cyclist, born 1912) - Wikipedia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tommy_Godwin_(cyclist,_born_1912)

My greatest gains have come from cycling well past the point of exhaustion and discomfort many times, 80 miles per day with a loaded bike would probably be at the upper end of what I'd enjoy doing for anything long term.

Pulled a 130 plus mile day from Perry's bike hostel near Jackson LA to Bayou Chicotte state park with 4 panniers plus bob trailer with my 12 lb chihuahua felt great but something of an outlier based on wanting to reach a specific camp site and getting an early start.


I remember this thread! This was a good one.

The thing is, we are all far more physically capable of doing way more than we give ourselves credit for or allow ourselves to do. Whatever it may be.

The main reason I do endurance stuff is to get to that point of discomfort
to be raw with pain
and want nothing more than to quit
but find the fortitude to keep going
and come out on the other side with renewed vigor.
Endurance is a microcosm of life in that if you make it through the low points there's always something pretty waiting for you; whether it be mentally, emotionally, or asthetically.
This is a very powerful exercise. Make friends with pain and you will never be alone.
 

Solfinger

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Apr 16, 2020
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I rode the bicentennial trail from VA beach to the coast of Oregon with some friends. 55 miles/day was average pace we planned on. After a few longer days, we would be ahead of our pace, and could stop and just enjoy where we were for a day or so.
 
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The most I've done with a trailer, gear and dog was 58 miles, very flat terrain and I started before the sun came up and didn't finish till around 11 pm.. I probably average 20 miles or so because I'm never in a hurry. I just recently gave up on a boat expedition and went back to cycling so if anyone wants to ride together hit me up, I goof off and check stuff out all over so covering distance isn't a goal, having fun is always the goal
 

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