Snakes in the wild (1 Viewer)

Benji91

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Just wondering how people deal with snakes in the wild.

I've encountered a fair few carpet pythons in the bushland near me, they're big (and scary looking) but fairly easy to handle. Personally, I have a little experience with larger, non-venomous snakes like these - as well as cute little tree snakes - and I know how to move them (either way from camp or away from the road so they gorgeous things don't get run over).

Recently, I've seen more and more venomous snakes when hiking. I generally hike alone (part due to lack of anyone to explore with, part because I enjoy the solitude), if I'm far enough away from roads/people/phones and get bitten by an Eastern Brown or the like it may well be the end of me.

So really just asking if anyone has anyone had much experience with venomous snakes (no matter where in the world you are) and, if so, any tips on how to move them along without hurting them?

Cheers :)
 
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AlwaysLost

I closed my account
Most fatal snake bites usually involve males age 18-25, alcohol, and their last words are usually..

Hey bro check this out!

Snakes are more scared of you than you are of them. Just back away slowly and leave them alone. You are statistically way more likely to kill yourself falling down in the woods than by snakebite. Just don't be stupid and try and kill or catch it.

Don't try to move them whatever you do. All you can do is make noise from a safe distance away like 20 - 30 feet . I also gently probe brush with my walling stick before walking through it.
 
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Benji91

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Haha I'm fully aware of people like that.

I've only every handled non-venomous snakes and have had a little training and enough experience to know the basics...and never start out with "Hey bro, check this". ;)

Not in the game of catching/killing them. My main worry, and they're exaggerated worries, is having one of the potentially nasty ones crawly into camp or striking out when I'm going through long grass (boots and thicker pants usually fix the latter when out bush, but summer can get too hot for too much gear). Any situation like this is highly unlikely, I know.

We've had a really dry summer here and there have been more than a few cases of Eastern Brown's (and the like) being found in people's homes, being uncharacteristically aggressive and whatnot.

There aren't many creatures I'm paranoid about, but after being bitten by a red-belly black snake as a kid snakes (other than pythons) have been on that list - and I've seen more this year than ever before!

As always, common sense prevails!

Cheers for you comments :)
 
A

AlwaysLost

I closed my account
Haha I'm fully aware of people like that.

I've only every handled non-venomous snakes and have had a little training and enough experience to know the basics...and never start out with "Hey bro, check this". ;)

Not in the game of catching/killing them. My main worry, and they're exaggerated worries, is having one of the potentially nasty ones crawly into camp or striking out when I'm going through long grass (boots and thicker pants usually fix the latter when out bush, but summer can get too hot for too much gear). Any situation like this is highly unlikely, I know.

We've had a really dry summer here and there have been more than a few cases of Eastern Brown's (and the like) being found in people's homes, being uncharacteristically aggressive and whatnot.

There aren't many creatures I'm paranoid about, but after being bitten by a red-belly black snake as a kid snakes (other than pythons) have been on that list - and I've seen more this year than ever before!

As always, common sense prevails!

Cheers for you comments :)

Holy crap I m so tired it escaped me that you are Australian. Yeah you have some seriously dangerous snakes there. You've seriously handled venomous snakes?
 
A

AlwaysLost

I closed my account
Haha I'm fully aware of people like that.

I've only every handled non-venomous snakes and have had a little training and enough experience to know the basics...and never start out with "Hey bro, check this". ;)

Not in the game of catching/killing them. My main worry, and they're exaggerated worries, is having one of the potentially nasty ones crawly into camp or striking out when I'm going through long grass (boots and thicker pants usually fix the latter when out bush, but summer can get too hot for too much gear). Any situation like this is highly unlikely, I know.

We've had a really dry summer here and there have been more than a few cases of Eastern Brown's (and the like) being found in people's homes, being uncharacteristically aggressive and whatnot.

There aren't many creatures I'm paranoid about, but after being bitten by a red-belly black snake as a kid snakes (other than pythons) have been on that list - and I've seen more this year than ever before!

As always, common sense prevails!

Cheers for you comments :)

You must have cajones of steel to be going out in the bush. I've had Australian friends who told me that pretty much everything in the bush can hurt you even this evil cassowarie bird with a velociraptor claw
 

Benji91

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Yeah, we have some (potentially) evil little fuckers out here...but, as you said, they're more scared of us. + if you close enough to help the chance

I've only handled non-venomous snakes - carpet pythons (which get pretty big, their bites hurt and will break skin but they're non-venomous) and tree snakes (which are just cute little things).
 

Benji91

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@AlmostAlwaysLost Eh, I honestly think they whole "everything wants to kill you" vibe is totally exaggerated...but fun to play up to people who haven't been out here ;)

It all comes down to where you go, how prepared you are and not being stupid.

Things like, if you're far enough north and going for a swim in a creek/dam/whatever make sure there are signs around otherwise crocodiles could be lurking or not provoking/getting up too close to wild roos because they will do you some major damage.

...cassowaries though, I hear they'll fuck you up proper! They're way further north than where I am so I'm not too concerned.

Side note - I hate the "dingo stole my baby" bullshit (assume that's still a phrase known worldwide) and want to headbutt anyone that says it. I love those creatures so much!
 

Dmac

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Aren't like 7 of the worlds most deadly snakes in Australia, not to mention many slightly less deadly venomous and poisonous critters and insects?
 
A

AlwaysLost

I closed my account
@AlmostAlwaysLost Eh, I honestly think they whole "everything wants to kill you" vibe is totally exaggerated...but fun to play up to people who haven't been out here ;)

It all comes down to where you go, how prepared you are and not being stupid.

Things like, if you're far enough north and going for a swim in a creek/dam/whatever make sure there are signs around otherwise crocodiles could be lurking or not provoking/getting up too close to wild roos because they will do you some major damage.

...cassowaries though, I hear they'll fuck you up proper! They're way further north than where I am so I'm not too concerned.

Side note - I hate the "dingo stole my baby" bullshit (assume that's still a phrase known worldwide) and want to headbutt anyone that says it. I love those creatures so much!

Lmao I haven't heard a dingo ate my baby since I was a kid. I didn't realize it was still a thing.
 

Koala

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I've only run into one snake my whole time here in Straya, and it too was a carpet python! Scared the shit out of me, was walking on the road to Tallows Beach in Byron Bay at around midnight to go camp where I always do when I'm there, and there was a GIANT python slithering across the road!! Was almost as long as the two lane road was wide...no joke... I was enjoying the stars and had only turned my phone torch (flashlight) on a minute or so before I came upon the python...thank god cause I wouldn't have see him until I was right upon him!!
 
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Benji91

Gone Walkabout
Joined
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Jinibara Country (Qld, Australia)
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@Koala, that would've given you a hell of a fright!

First time I came across a python I was driving up in the mountains (Mt Glorious, from memory) with a close mate of mine. She stopped the car, didn't say anything and just got out to look at what I thought was a big stick lying across the road. Nope, python.

We're both animal lovers (she has worked with numerous wildlife rescue groups, I help out when I can) and we didn't want to see the poor thing run over...so, after making sure he wasn't hurt, she showed me how and where to grab him and put him back in the bush. Was such a great experience, I've saved a few on my own now.
 

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